Relocation

It’s a local bar with a difference – the  difference being its locality.

Welcome to Sandy’s Bar, not at the end of the street but plonked right in the middle.

Just days ago this was part of The Sugar Bowl, summer hangout at Breezy Point’s shore. Until it was ripped from its  moorings by Hurricane Sandy and delivered to Gerritsen Beach, according to the  people living there.

Incredible: The Sugar Bowl bar was swept for seven miles from the Breezy Point area of New York to this location in Gerritsen BeachThe Sugar Bowl bar was swept for seven miles  from the Breezy Point area of New York to this location in Gerritsen Beach
How it used to look: The Sugar Bowl in Breezy Point before its extraordinary journey. It turned up in Gerritsen Beach complete with tables and chairs, shot glasses and an impressively stocked barHow it used to look: The Sugar Bowl in Breezy Point  before its extraordinary journey. It turned up in Gerritsen Beach complete with  tables and chairs, shot glasses and an impressively stocked bar

An incredible journey of around seven miles,  across the bay and made even more remarkable by the fact that it turned up  complete with tables and chairs, shot glasses and an impressively stocked  bar.

With its clapboard walls and freshly painted window sills it looks like something straight out of The Wizard of Oz.

Little wonder one local speculated that it  had been picked up by the wind and dropped where it sat on Madoc Street, Gerritsen Beach.

In fact one man knew exactly what had  happened.

Astonishing: The Sugar Bowl floated into Gerritsen Beach on floodwaters, ending up in the middle of a street. Locals quickly renamed it 'Sandy's Bar'The Sugar Bowl floated into Gerritsen Beach  on floodwaters, ending up in the middle of a street. Locals quickly renamed it  ‘Sandy’s Bar’
Intact: The building's interior remained in remarkably good condition despite the extraordinary seven-mile journey The building’s interior remained in remarkably  good condition despite the extraordinary seven-mile journey
Venue: Gerritsen Beach resident Lawrence Lowey enjoys a beer in the abandoned bar which turned up in the middle of his street Gerritsen Beach resident Lawrence Lowey enjoys a beer in the abandoned bar which turned up in the middle of his street
Surprise: The residents of Gerritsen Beach could hardly believe their luck when a readily available supply of alcohol floated into their neighborhoodThe residents of Gerritsen Beach could hardly believe their luck when a readily available supply of alcohol floated into their neighborhood
Refreshments: Some of the drinks found in the bar when the Sugar Bowl turned up in Gerritsen Beach Some of the drinks found in the bar when  the Sugar Bowl turned up in Gerritsen Beach
Party time: Residents of Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn, hooked up a generator and had fun when they found the bar was fully stockedResidents of Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn, took the opportunity to have a break from the misery when they found the bar was fully stocked
Having a drink: Some of the revellers who enjoyed themselves when the Sugar Bowl washed up in Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn Some of the revellers who enjoyed  themselves when the Sugar Bowl washed up in Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn

Charlie Coppolino, 42, witnessed the arrival  of the bar, thought to be a portion of The Sugar Bowl that wasn’t flattened by  the storm.

He said: ‘I looked out my bedroom window and  I saw what looked like a house just flying past. The water must have been five,  six feet deep.

‘I said, “Ma we’re in trouble!’ It came in  Jamaica Bay and smashed my gazebo, through my gate, ran over a car and just went  down the road about five miles an hour like a steamroller.’

Cycling up to where the bar sat askew Lawrence Lowey, a resident of Gerritsen for 17 years joked, ‘I told  them to  park my bar and look where they put it. You can’t get the help.’

According to resident Billy Gooch, ‘All of us  here, we’d had the panic we’d been  through hell and the day after the storm  we’d worked all day to save  what we could.

Journey: This illustration shows how the bar was swept out into the water from its original location in Breezy Point before being washed up at Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn. Witnesses said it was travelling in floodwater up to six feet deepThis illustration shows how the bar was swept  out into the water from its original location in Breezy Point before being  washed up at Gerritsen Beach, Brooklyn. Witnesses said it was travelling in  floodwater up to six feet deep
Renamed: The revellers called the bar 'Sandy's Bar' after the superstorm and marked 'BYOB' on the side of it to instruct guests to bring their own bottles when the drink ran out...The revellers called the bar ‘Sandy’s Bar’  after the superstorm and marked ‘BYOB’ on the side of it to instruct guests to  bring their own bottles when the drink ran out…
...but the fun couldn't last forever, and the police ordered for the bar to be demolished and cleared away…but the fun couldn’t last forever, and the police ordered for the bar to be demolished and cleared away
Condemned: The digger reduces the venue to a pile of debris under police directionThe digger reduces the venue to a pile of  debris under police direction
Fun over: Partygoer Michael Farrell stands in front of the debris after police ordered for the bar to be demolished Partygoer Michael Farrell stands in front of  the debris after police ordered for the bar to be demolished

‘There’s this bar – it’s got Hennessy,  Captain Morgans, 12 year old Maclallan, vodka and cases of Heineken…well what  were we going to do? We had a party. We needed to let off steam.’

Once stocks ran out the bar, believed to be  the Sugar Shack part of the Sugar Bowl bar, operated a strict Bring Your Own  Bottle policy.

It turned out to be a last hoorah for the  bar. By late afternoon the police had turned up.

Believing  they were there to remove a  fibre glass boat they were initially utterly bemused by what they  found.

But ultimately, and to boos from the  good-natured locals, they called time on The Sugar Bowl/Sandy’s Bar, breaking it  up and clearing it away.

Destruction: The Breezy Point area of New York was devastated by Superstorm Sandy, with flooding and fires wrecking homes and businessesThe Breezy Point area of New York was  devastated by Superstorm Sandy, with flooding and fires wrecking homes and  businesses

Attribution: Laura Collins and Daniel Bates

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About thecommonconstitutionalist

Brent is not a scholar. He’s not an author or speaker (yet). He hasn’t published a book nor does he write articles for magazines (yet). He has no advanced literary degree or pedigree (never will). He is just an American who writes and shares what interests him. He cares about the salvation of this country and a return to its Constitutional roots. He believes in God, country and family.
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