Still Fab

Their cries were said to have been deafening to the band with their tears having run from the eyes of the first to witness  the Beatles play in America.

Appearing in newly released photos of the Beatles’ first concert in the U.S. are these adoring young women whose cries, tears and screams took their passion to a never before seen new level.

Turning the cameras from the Washington D.C. Coliseum’s small island stage and back on to their crowd are the googly eyed women showcasing the all-out hysterics of Beatlemania.

Beyond adoring: Screaming and wailing, the first Beatle fans to witness the band perform in the U.S. in 1964 are pictured The first Beatle  fans to witness the band perform in the U.S. in 1964 are pictured
Overwhelming affection: A young woman slaps her hands to her face while screaming making up a room full of cries that prevented the band from hearing themselves playA young woman slaps her hands to  her face while screaming making up a room full of cries that prevented the band  from hearing themselves play

Taken by a rookie 18-year-old  photographer  in February of 1964, the iconic images show the band at the start of their  American invasion, just two days after appearing on the  Ed Sullivan Show in New  York.

Ten days earlier the band had gone to number  one for the first time stateside with ‘I want to hold your hand’– the first of  59 weeks they would spend at the top over the next six  and a half  years.

Mike  Mitchell was there, shooting photos  from just feet away and even jumping onto the stage for the group’s pre-concert  press call.

Among the highlights is a backlit shot of the band that he took while standing directly behind them.

Auctioned off in July of 2011, that photo made $68,500. Its pre-sale estimate was $2,000 to $3,000.

Girls on a mission: Dressed otherwise civil, the girls in skirts, collared shirts and cardigans lose themselves two days after the band appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show in New York
Not published in LIFE. Fans at the first Beatles concert in America, Washington, DC, Feb. 11, 1964.
While dressed otherwise civil in skirts, collared shirts and cardigans, the girls soon lose themselves two days after seeing the band appear on the Ed Sullivan Show in New York
Enthusiastic welcome: No use covering their mouths, the girls' cries swamped the small island stage welcoming the Fab Four to Washington, D.C.Enthusiastic welcome: No use covering their mouths, the  girls’ cries swamped the small island stage welcoming the Fab Four to  Washington, D.C.

An image of an animated Ringo Starr on the drums sold for $8,125. It was estimated to bring $3,000 to $5,000.

Auction house Christie’s said the shot  depicts a rare moment where Starr was  both drummer and lead singer on a song  written by Paul McCartney and  John Lennon, but made famous by The Rolling  Stones, ‘I Wanna Be Your Man’.

Cathy Elkies, Christie’s director of iconic collections, said she expected the bids to exceed the pre-sale estimates.

‘Beatles fans are fierce. To uncover this trove of images that’s never been published will really excite people,’ she  said.

Also included in the sale were photos of the  band’s September 13 1964, performance at the Baltimore Civic  Center.

Mr Mitchell said he was given unrestricted  access to the band’s concert in Washington DC.

Mad About the Boys: Rare Photos of Beatles Fans, 1964
Stan Wayman/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
The start of something: Ringo Starr sings and plays the drums at the concert, which came ten days after the band’s first number one hit in the U.S.
U.S. invasion: The photos capture a young Paul McCartney and John Lennon at the start of BeatlemaniaThe photos capture a young Paul McCartney  and John Lennon at the start of Beatlemania
Top dollar: A silhouette of the Fab Four captures the Beatles at their start as part of a larger collection of photos that sold at auction for $361,938 in July of 2011 A silhouette of the Fab Four captures the  Beatles at their start as part of a larger collection of photos that sold at  auction for $361,938 in July of 2011

‘It was a long time ago. Things weren’t that way then,’ said the  65-year-old, who now works as an art photographer in Washington.

‘It was as low-tech as the concert itself.  The concert was in a sports venue and the sound system was the sound system of  a sports venue.’

Equally astonishing is how few other photographs from that first concert exist.

Simeon Lipman, Christie’s pop culture consultant, said it’s not clear why there weren’t many other photos of the  concert.

He said Mr Mitchell’s black and white photographs were remarkable for their ‘animated” and ‘intimate’ depiction of the  Fab Four.

Mr Mitchell stored the negatives for years in  a box in his basement and used digital technology to scan and restore the  prints for the auction.

‘They benefit from a historical perspective,’  he said

Attribution: Dail Mail

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About thecommonconstitutionalist

Brent is not a scholar. He’s not an author or speaker (yet). He hasn’t published a book nor does he write articles for magazines (yet). He has no advanced literary degree or pedigree (never will). He is just an American who writes and shares what interests him. He cares about the salvation of this country and a return to its Constitutional roots. He believes in God, country and family.
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One Response to Still Fab

  1. jumpingpolarbear says:

    Beatlemania will never be matched :).

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